Bucsu
Bucsu, Hungary
  • Příběh
  • Místo

From the granary to the tussocky

Dostupné v: English | Magyar

They didn't have any cigarettes, so the three young men who wanted to leave for Austria, among them Jenő Ivánfi, got off the bus in Bucsu to look for a shop. There were bells above the door. The shopkeeper came and looked at them and he had only one question: ’Did anybody see you coming here?’ He served them and suddenly he sent them to the back of the store. The door opened, the bells rang again. ’Police! Have you seen any stranger here?’ ’No – he said –, I haven’t. I have all my stock here. Nobody comes to buy.’ The policemen went away. Jenő Ivánfi and his friends said goodbye, they reached the stone cross, they knocked at the gate in front of it as they had been told by the trafficker. The dogs ran out, also the owner came. ’Follow me to the granary!’ "All of us had a briefcase, nothing else. A towel, toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, other stuff like that, a big portion of speck with red pepper packed carefully, and we went to the granary, the four of us,” he recalled. I must ask you to lie down in this wain.’ Stalks of turnsole and of corn covered the bottom of the cart. He made them to lie down on it one beside the other and finally he covered them with the stalks: "We put a handkerchief on our face in order that we could take breath. We spoke to each other quietly, whispering in the wain. We heard the bells. One, two, three, four hours passed, it was getting dark.” Finally the landowner came: ’Get off the cart! The night raid comes after dark, and the soldiers push their bayonets into the stacks. So I have to see you across the tussocky to the tziganes.’ The tziganes made them enter. Guests have arrived, boys! Where are the violins?’ They brought wine and the refugees had to tell them about what had happened in Budapest: "And we began to enjoy ourselves literally forcibly. We didn't know what would happen to us, whether we could go on across the tussocky to the border.”

Jenő Ivánfi

Jenő Ivánfi

Jenő Ivánfi was born as Jenő Ivancsics in 1929 in Eger. His father was railway engineer, he had to choose a Hungarian family name as a civil servant when he was appointed chief counsellor at Hungarian National Railways. Jenő Ivánfi graduated at György Fráter Secondary School of the Minorities in Miskolc. In 1947 he began his university studies at the Science Faculty of Szeged University. Despite his excellent grades he was expelled among the first political victims from the university for having backed Cardinal József Mindszenty in public. In 1949 thanks to his professors’ support he could continue his studies at Loránd Eötvös University in Budapest. He became chemist, he got his degree in 1952, but he could get a job but a working place where others didn’t want to go. So he went to work to Borsod Chemical Trust, and was trained in energetics and coal chemicals at the different firms of the Trust, he supervised the construction of the Coke Plant in Kazincbarcika. He married Éva Joszt in 1953. In 1954 he managed to move to the new Research Institute for Heavy Chemistry where he worked as research engineer. His family, his wife and his newborn daughter, Andrea, followed him to Veszprém. His second daughter Mónika was born in 1956. During the Hungarian revolution he saved the wounded from the line the fire in Budapest and he distributed leaflets. After the Soviet invasion of November 4th some members of his family succeeded to fly to Austria. He decided with two friends of his to follow their example. They left for Szombathely by train. In the train he met a colleague whom he gave the keys of his flat. He met a stranger, too, "Uncle János,” who offered himself to help them to cross the green border. He said he was a former border officer. By his help they managed to cross the Austrian frontier. They got an accommodation in the refugee camp at the fortress of Stadtschlaiding. Jenő Ivánfi and one of his friends, who wanted to go on to West Germany, was housed in Wien by an Austrian acquaintance of him. They applied for jobs immediately at the embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany. Thanks also to his German knowledge, since December 1956 he was employed at EBV Hauptlaboratorium in Alsdorf, (Germany, before Bundesrepublic of Deutschland,) as analytical engineer until 1961. After he had had accommodations and a job he asked for the reunion of his family. He got the German entrance permit for them in a very brief time, but the Hungarian authorities hindered his wife and his children to leave the Hungarian People’s Republic. So finally in 1961 he decided to rejoin his family and to return in Hungary. Returned home, he lived in Debrecen. He earned his living as ordure cleaner, and unskilled worker. The political police watched him and contacted him several times. In 1961 he finally got a job at the Stain Factory in Tiszaszederkény of the Tisza Chemical Plants, he became again there research engineer. He regularly published papers in professional periodicals and he was sent to international conferences due to his language knowledge. He soon was appointed the head of the research department. However the political police continued to control him and they tried to recruit him to be an intelligent agent by promising that he could leave the country with his family. His third child András was born in 1964. In 1972 he asked his placement to Borsod Chemical Trust in Kazincbarcika. Here he was product manager since 1982, and he organized the production of PVC windows on national scale. He retired in 1989. He joined the Christian Democratic People’s Party and led the local organization of it. In 1990 he became vice-major of the city of Kazincbarcika. In 1994 he was honoured the Gold Cross of the Hungarian Republic. He lives in Sajógalgóc with his wife in a beautifully restored old house built in the 18th century. Founder of the Local Circle for Monuments’ Protection, his hobby is the history of the so-called cul-de-sac villages.

Bucsu

Dostupné v: English | Magyar

Bucsu is a small Hungarian municipality, west of Szombathely, on the Austrian border. The small Arany (Golden) brook cuts across it. Parallel to the river there is the main street, (former Main street, now Rohonczi road) ,of this tiny one-street village. Along the main road the center part of the village are broader. You can find here in the middle of the street the most important curiosity of the place, the Saint Michael Catholic Church. The railroad linking Szombathely with Pinkafő, south of Bucsu, was built in 1888 and it connected the place to the circulation of the country. However on March 1, 1953 the border in the direction of Rohonc was closed definitely and this line lost its importance. Nevertheless trains continued to pass on the Hungarian side of the border until 1960 when the rails were undone. So after WWII Bucsu lost its communication both with the Austrian district Rechnitz, and the Hungarian village Bozsok. The road to Rechnitz hasn’t yet been rebuilt since then. In 1976 a new check point was set up south-west of Bucsu in the direction of Schachendorf. It was closed in 2007 when Hungary joined the Schengen Agreement.

Bucsu

Na tomto místě

From the granary to the tussocky

From the granary to the tussocky

Jenő Ivánfi
Uncle János directed us with a tomahawk

Uncle János directed us with a tomahawk

Jenő Ivánfi
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