Dyjákovice
Headquarters of the border guard · Blaustaudnerhof 1, 2136, Austria
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I must have set a new Olympic record at the barbed-wire entanglements

Available in: English | Česky

In 1968, Zdeněk Hostaša decided to attempt a third escape from Czechoslovakia: “When the Russians came, I knew I had to get away.” The former CIC agent had eight years of imprisonment in the harsh conditions of the Leopold prison under his belt. In September 1968, he arrived at the border together with the Jardamcovy brothers: “There was a terrible fog. We ran directly into a watchtower.” After they were spotted by the border guards, Zdeněk Hostaša was the only one who managed to run away. He waded through the Thaya River and ran to the first fence of the complex wire obstacles that had been installed to protect the state border. “I climbed up that fence and in doing so, I must have set a new Olympic world record. I was all torn up, especially my hands. I jumped into the corridor and surmounted more wires,” he recalled. Gradually, Zdeněk Hostaša made it over all three fences, and so he made it to Austria.

Zdeněk Hostaša

Zdeněk Hostaša

Zdeněk Hostaša was born on June 15, 1935, in Hranice na Moravě, Czechoslovakia, the first child to a family of a fruit merchant. He lost his father in 1943 when he was deported to Auschwitz and shot there for his involvement in the so-called “Pavázská group” that was part of the anti-fascist resistance movement. In the beginning of the 1950s, Zdeněk Hostaša began working for a steamship company and took part in a voyage to Western Europe. This is where he gained experience with a non-communist country. However, because of disagreements with his employer, he lost his job a lifeguard after less than a year and had look for a new one. He subsequently attempted several different professions such as a locksmith and then a miner. In 1953, he made his first attempt to cross the Iron Curtain to Austria, but failed to his disappointment. Two years later, he managed to escape and get to West Berlin on a train. He went through several refugee camps and accepted the offer of the U.S. intelligence service CIC to become their agent. In return for the completion of certain tasks, he was promised emigration to the USA. After six months of training, he was sent to Czechoslovakia under a false identity with specific tasks. When trying to establish contact with an informant, however, he was caught by the police on May 13, 1956, in Prague. A military court in Trenčín sentenced him to 20 years of imprisonment in the former fortress of Leopoldov. There he met with prominent political prisoners, such as Bishop Jan Anastázy Opasek. Following some legislative amendments in 1964, he was released from prison with twenty-years of probation. He worked as a miner in the Ostrava mines. The invasion of the Warsaw-Pact forces into Czechoslovakia became the trigger Zdeněk’s next run-away attempt. After staying for a while in a refugee camp, he emigrated with his wife and children to Chile, where they stayed for three years before coming to Texas in 1971. Zdeněk Hostaša worked there at a gas station and then at a nuclear reactor. After the Velvet Revolution, he and his wife returned to their homeland.

Dyjákovice

Available in: English | Česky

The original German inhabitants of this south-Moravian village were displaced after WWII. The border zone was established in 1950 and the village of Dyjákovice was located in its direct proximity. A company of the border guard that was part of the 4th brigade of the border guard garrisoned in Znojmo had its headquarters there.

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